Priority Grants Research Fund

Abstracts of Priority Research Project Funded for FY 2013

Christen Szymanski, Patrick Brice
Clerc Center; Psychology
Applying Evidenced Based Practices for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children with Autism and/or Developmental Disabilities at Home and in the Classroom
Lawrence Pick, Daniel Koo, Karen Garrido-Nag
Psychology; Hearing, Speech, Language Sciences
Cognitive and Electrophysiological Correlates of Phonological Processes in Deaf Undergraduate Readers

NEW GRANTS

Applying Evidenced Based Practices for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children with Autism and/or Developmental Disabilities at Home and in the Classroom

Principal Investigator:
Christen Szymanski
Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center
Co-Investigator:
Patrick Brice
Department of Psychology, Gallaudet University

Children with Autism often face pervasive challenges in their abilities to interact with others, communicate their thoughts, wants, or needs effectively, regulate their emotions, and perform daily living skills independently. Despite an increased prevalence rate of hard of hearing children to have Autism, there remains a limited understanding of appropriate educational interventions, knowledge of general characteristics or symptoms, an understanding of social emotional development, and the influences that parents, caregivers and families have on these children in the classroom and at home. In order to address this gap, this research plans to investigate how principles of the only scientifically proven evidenced based treatment for children with developmental disabilities, Applied Behavioral Analysis may be utilized to facilitate learning for a child, while at the same time investigating the unique roles that families and teachers have in assuring success for deaf children with Autism and/or other developmental disabilities.

CONTINUED GRANTS

Cognitive and Electrophysiological Correlates of Phonological Processes in Deaf Undergraduate Readers

Principal Investigator:
Lawrence H. Pick, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Department of Psychology, Gallaudet University
Co-Investigator:
Daniel S. Koo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology, Gallaudet University
Co-Investigator:
Karen Garrido-Nag, M.Phil, M.S., Instructor
Department of Hearing, Speech, Language Sciences, Gallaudet University

Although much is known about the reading achievement levels of deaf individuals, we know less about how certain undergraduate students become strong readers. One prevailing assumption is that phonological awareness and processes, as well as working memory and executive functions play a critical role in reading achievement. Thus far, there is a paucity of neuropsychological data and neurophysiological evidence to support this claim in deaf individuals. This study will examine the cognitive and electrophysiological profiles of deaf undergraduate readers using American Sign Language as their primary mode of communication. A comprehensive battery of neuropsychological measures will be administered to gain a better understanding of the cognitive, linguistic, and reading profiles of strong versus weak readers. Further, Event Related Potential (ERP) recordings will be used to determine whether strong versus weak readers show amplitude and temporal differences in cortical regions known for phonological processing. A rhyme judgment paradigm will be employed to examine differential cortical responses at P200 and N400 indices for matched versus mismatched word pairs.


[Last modified: 2014.08.29 10:09:27. by Brian Showalter]

DISCLAIMER: This website contains documents with terms that may be considered by today's reader as outdated and even offensive. For example, the term "hearing impairment" is sometimes used as a category for levels of hearing loss, such as hard of hearing and deaf. Some people now see cultural identification and communication preference as defining characteristics behind terms such as hard of hearing and deaf, and they do not favor terms conveying medical distinctions and loss. Yet we recognize that removing and changing terms may alter the precise meaning of the scientific author. A solution may be found by expanding the scope of future research to include non-medical perspectives.
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