Research & Scholarly Achievement
at Gallaudet University

Science, Technology, and Mathematics

Research challenges faculty and students to transform learning, observations, and ideas into new solutions and products. This unit has active research in nanotechnology, remote sensing, limnology, pharmacognosy, organic synthesis, and biomedical areas. Mentored research, university collaborations, and internships provide students experience for work, advanced degrees, and medical/pharmaceutical professional careers.


Advancing students' science literacy

ID: 2340
Status: Ongoing
Start date: August 2013
End Date: August 2018

Description

The goal of this study is to advance students' science literacy and improve biology laboratory courses. Becoming science literate involves developing skills related to accessing science information beyond the classroom. However, science literacy is more than science knowledge and skills. Science literacy also involves seeing oneself as capable of engaging with science -- or being a "science person" -- and seeing science in everyday life. With positive attitudinal growth, students are more likely to engage with science outside of class. Using a mixed methods approach, the project focuses on learning about students' self-conception as a science person and attitudes about science influence science literacy development. The study focuses on learning how teaching practices can foster positive growth in students' attitudes toward science. The project will uncover student-informed strategies to cultivate students' affinities for science. Findings will be used to improve undergraduate science learning.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Gormally, C. (2017, Spring). Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Signing Undergraduates' Attitudes toward Science in Inquiry-Based Biology Laboratory Classes.CBE-Life Sciences Education; 16:1. 

Gormally, C. and A. Marchut. (2016, July). “Science isn’t my thing:” Exploring non-science majors’ science identities. Poster presented at the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER), Minneapolis, MN.

Gormally, C. and A. Marchut. (2016, March) “Science isn’t my thing:” Exploring non-science majors’ science identities. Poster presented at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo, Washington, DC.

Gormally, C. and A. Marchut. (2017). Inquiry-based laboratories & affective learning outcomes: do these labs improve students’ attitudes toward science and science identities? Poster presented at the Gallaudet University Research Expo, Washington, DC.

Gormally, C. and A. Marchut. (2017, Janurary). “Science isn’t my thing:” Exploring non-science majors’ science identities. Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilitie, Vol 20:1. 

Gormally, C., Sullivan, C. S., & Szeinbaum, N. (2016). Uncovering Barriers to Teaching Assistants (TAs) Implementing Inquiry Teaching: Inconsistent Facilitation Techniques, Student Resistance, and Reluctance to Share Control over Learning with Students . Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education, 17(2), 215–224. 

Marchut, A. and C. Gormally (2017). Successes and limitations of inquiry-based laboratories on affective learning outcomes for deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing signing students. Poster presented at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, San Antonio, TX.


Bismuth Telluride and Molybdenum Disulfide Nanomaterials

ID: 3484
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2016
End Date: October 2020

Description

This project aims to develop a protocol for large scale synthesis of molybdenum disulfide and bismuth telluride nanomaterials using the chemical exfoliation method.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P.; Huber, T. Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). (2017, August).  Lecture presentation at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Lalescu, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, Summer) Introduction to ASL and Deaf Culture.  Presented at Harvard University, Boston, MA. 

Lalescu, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, Summer) Introduction to ASL and Deaf Culture.  Presented at Howard University, Washington DC.  

Lalescu, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, August). Exfoliation of Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) using n-butyllithium. Lecture presentation at Harvard University, Boston, MA. 

Mbochwa, C., Sabila, P., Snyder, H. D., Huber, T & Johnson, S. (2016, October).  The Effects of Reaction time and Solvent System on MoS2 Exfoliation.  Poster presented at the 2016 Undergraduate Research Symposium at the University of Maryland-Baltimore campus, Baltimore, MD. 


Computer Simulations to Understand Disease Mechanisms

ID: 3390
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2016

Description

This project utilizes multiscale computer simulation methods to understand Mendelian disease mechanisms at the molecular level. Computer simulations use the tools of math and physics to solve problems in chemistry, biology and medicine. Mendalian diseases are monogenic disorders caused by a variation in one gene and sometimes run in families. In general, these are rare genetic disorders with no cure. Our approach is to understand how a single variation in a single gene can cause a disease at the molecular level. This is done by simulations of the natural and variant proteins and comparing various properties. Once we understand the effects of single variations, then, our next step is to possibly design drugs to reverse the harmful effects. Currently, computer simulations are being run in our HPC Limulus supercomputer located at Hall Memorial Building as well as Clemson Palmetto Supercomputing cluster through our collaboration. 

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017). A Whone New Virtual World: Computational Chemistry. Presented at Gallaudet University Research Expo, Washington, DC.

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017). Effects of Rett Syndrome Mutations on MeCP2 Stability and Binding to DNA. Presented at International Conference on GEnomic Medicine, Baltimore, MD.


Creation of a DNA repository to identify deafness genes

ID: 34
Status: Ongoing
Start date: July 2001
End Date: September 2018

Description

This project is a collaborative effort between Gallaudet (Biology Program, Department of  Science, Technology, and Mathematics) and the Department of Human Genetics at the Medical College of Virginia to establish a large repository of DNA samples from deaf individuals and their families. These DNA samples are screened for common forms of deafness and then made available to other investigators for studies of hereditary deafness.

Principal investigators

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Priorities addressed


Effectiveness of mentoring in science research

ID: 2611
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2014
End Date: January 2018

Description

Disabled individuals, women, and cultural and ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in STEM. Research has shown that mentoring increases success for underrepresented individuals. Available mentoring survey instruments have all been developed for the majority population and were not intended to capture factors for successful mentoring of underrepresented groups. In this project, we are developing and validating a next-generation mentoring survey drawing from prior mentoring instruments, but also incorporating capital theory and critical race theory. From critical race theory, this survey includes community cultural wealth, which is thought to be instrumental to the success of individuals from minority communities. Our survey focuses on mentoring relationships between Deaf and hard of hearing protégés and their research advisors. From the pilot survey results we have identified three segregating factors. The first two factors contain traditional capitals. The third factor, community cultural wealth, was well conferred when Deaf protégés were paired with mentors who were either Deaf or had knowledge of American Sign Language and Deaf culture. This next-generation survey is geared for improving the success of underrepresented groups in STEM and can be used for hypothesis testing or for generating constructive feedback for mentors. Our results so far suggest that cultural awareness training may be a strategy for improving mentoring effectiveness.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Braun, DC, Gormally C, Clark MD. (2017). The Deaf Mentoring Survey: A Community Cultural Wealth Framework for Measuring Mentoring Effectiveness with Underrepresented Students. CBE-Life Sciences Education,16(1):10.

Braun, DC, Gormally C, Clark MD. (2017,June). Applications of the Deaf Mentoring Survey to Medical Education. Presented at the Association of Medical Professionals with Hearing Loss (AMPHL), Rochester, NY.

Braun, DC. (2017, June). Best Practices to Mentor and Collaborate with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Scientists. Presented at the Rochester Summer Research Training Institute (RSRTI), Rochester, NY.


Evolutionary and functional analysis of dubious open reading frames suggest a functional role in yeast genomes

ID: 3080
Status: Completed
Start date: August 2015
End Date: February 2017

Description

The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome has been studied extensively since it was first sequenced 20 years ago. A number of open-reading frames in this genome are still classified as "dubious," including those that overlap open-reading frames known to encode functional proteins. We reexamined whether this status is still warranted, given the large increase in data from numerous sources. These data include genomic information from other members of the Saccharomyces clade and transcriptome information from Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown under a number of different conditions. Using genomic data we first examined the conservation of these open reading frames (ORFs) compared to other members of the clade. Second, we examined existing data from tiling microarray and RNA-seq experiments. Our data show that these ORFs are in fact conserved and many of them are differentially expressed, suggesting a functional role.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Arora, G. (2016, July). Evolutionary and functional analysis of dubious open reading frames suggest a functional role in yeast genomes. Presented at the TAGC, Orlando, Fl.


Examining genetic microbial diversity to monitor pathogens and toxins and in the Anacostia River, DC

ID: 3492
Status: Ongoing
Start date: March 2017
End Date: February 2018

Description

The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. is classified as an impaired river due to many anthropogenic influences based on several indicators. In this study, we offer to look at three main indicators (fecal bacteria, chlorophyll a, and toxics) in the Anacostia River report card using genetic tools to provide a closer resolution about the exposure and health risks associated with full- and limited-contact recreational activities.

We propose to monitor genetic diversity of phytoplankton, bacteria, and viruses, especially those that would be considered “contaminants of concern,” either because they are pathogenic or produce toxins that could cause health risks over a nutrient gradient in the Anacostia River. Samples will be collected at three sites during spring, summer, and fall (two times each season) to assess relationships between genetic diversity and environmental conditions (temperature, dissolved oxygen, nutrients N and P) to better understand the persistence and growth conditions of microbes in the Anacostia River to prevent potential hazardous conditions. This project will directly contribute to monitoring the influence of the pre- and post-construction of green and gray infrastructure to the changing nutrient dynamics for local phytoplankton and bacterial and viral communities, and how it impacts local residents who use the Anacostia River for recreation.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Humlicek, G., Arora, G., & Solomon, C.M. (2017). Analysis of Bacterial and Algal Diversity in the Anacostia River. Presented at NSF-INCLUDES symposium, Auburn University, Auburn, AL.

Humlicek, G., Arora, G., & Solomon, C.M. (2017).  Analysis of Bacterial and Algal Diversity in the Anacostia River.  Presented at the summer internship symposium, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.


Experiences of LGBTQIA-Identified Faculty in Biology Classrooms

ID: 3061
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2015
End Date: March 2018

Description

Individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA) make up an estimated 3.6% of the overall U.S. population. As a group, LGBTQIA individuals have been thought to be historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), but few empirical studies have been done. We know very little about LGBTQIA instructors in STEM. This study seeks to understand what LGBTQIA biology faculty perceive to be advantages, disadvantages, barriers, challenges, benefits, and opportunities of coming out on campus and the role of their identity in their professional lives.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Brownell, S., C. Gormally, K. Cooper. (2017) Coming out in life (sciences): LGBTQIA instructors’ experiences in biology. Poster, National Association for Research in Science Teaching, San Antonio, TX.


Genetic deafness in alumni of Gallaudet University

ID: 217
Status: Ongoing
Start date: April 2004
End Date: September 2018

Description

This project, designed to extend the 1898 study of Deaf families by Gallaudet's vice president at the time, Professor E.A. Fay, is a collaborative effort between Gallaudet's Biology Program, Department of Science, Technology, and Mathematics, and the Department of Human Genetics at the Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University. The goal is to identify and characterize rare genes that interact to cause deafness. A novel molecular genetic approach to identifying these genes will be used in the Deaf offspring of Deaf parents.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Diaz-Horta, O., Sirmaci, A., Doherty, D., Nance, W., Arnos, K., Pandya, A., & Tekin, M. (2012). GPSM2 mutations in Chudley-Mccullough Syndrome. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, 158A(11), 2972-2973.

Dodson, K. M., Blanton, S. H., Welch, K. O., Norris, V. W., Nuzzo, R. L., Wegelin, J. A., Marin, R. S., Nance, W. E., Pandya, A., & Arnos, K. S. (2011). Vestibular dysfunction in deafness. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, 155, 993-1000.

Dodson, K., Georgolios, A., Barr, N., Nguyen, B., Sismanis, A., Arnos, K., … Pandya, A. (2012). Etiology of unilateral hearing loss in a national hereditary deafness repository. American Journal of Otolaryngology, 33(5), 590-594.

Rendtorff, N. D., Lodahl, M., Boulahbel, I. R., Johansen, I. R., Pandya, A., Welch, K. O., Norris, V. W., Arnos, K. S., Bitner-Blindzicz, M., Emery, S. B., Mets, M. B., Fagerheim, T., Eriksson, K., Hansen, L., Bruhn, H., Moller, C., Lindholm, S., Ensgard, S., Lesperance, M. M., & Tranebjaerg, L. (2011). Identification of p.A684V missense mutation in the WFS1 gene as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant optic atrophy and hearing impairment. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, 155,1298-1313.

Yelverton, J., Arnos, K., Xia, X., Nance, W., Pandya, A., & Dodson, K. (2013). The clinical and audiologic features of hearing loss due to mitochondrial mutations. Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 148(6), 1017-1022.


Image processing for NASA applications

ID: 1040
Status: Ongoing
Start date: May 2002
End Date: January 2020

Description

Software is being developed to improve geolocating Corona spy satellite photos from the 1960s. The winter and spring (2014) studies were done of how the accuracy of mapping depended on the starting point for optimization software. Five hundred good starting points were identified for each frame of a Corona image, and automated searches were done to minimize mapping error. It was expected that these searches would identify a few local minima where the search software would get stuck and some of the searches would find a true minimum error state. It was discovered that the lowest minimum error corresponded to the 30m resolution of the images used for calibrating the mapping. Other minima were scattered over the parameter space instead of clustering at a few points. At the suggestion of a National Aeronautic Space Administration colleague, mapping points were recalibrated on higher resolution imagery over several months. The starting point studies need to be repeated. Work continues on providing and updating data resources for the www.oceanmotion.org educational website. The updates are typically done twice a year.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


Influence of consistently high levels of ammonium on food web dynamics in the Anacostia River

ID: 3063
Status: Completed
Start date: March 2016
End Date: February 2017

Description

The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. is classified as an impaired river from pollution based on several indicators; however, it is not well known how nutrient pollution and the different nitrogen (N) forms (i.e., NO3-, NH4+, urea) vary temporally or spatially or which N forms are of greatest concern. Such shifts in N form often influence the physiology of phytoplankton that lead to shifts in algal species and harmful or disruptive algal blooms. Recent literature suggests that excessive concentrations of NH4+ can lead to suppression of phytoplankton growth, which may have implications for migratory anadromous fish species that are filter feeders. Shifts in both phytoplankton community composition and fish communities will impact which fish are present in the Anacostia River for recreational and subsistence fishing. In order to properly assess N and food web dynamics in the Anacostia River, it is necessary to determine the effects of changing N form and proportions on phytoplankton and fish community composition and productivity. This project aims to assess the impact of NH4+ on phytoplankton and fish productivity and community composition in the Anacostia River’s N-enriched waters by both sampling of the river and conducting bioassay experiments. Samples will be collected over the course of a year bi-weekly from eleven sampling sites for assessment of nutrients, chlorophyll, and bacteria and phytoplankton community composition. Bioassay experiments done over several days will involve samples from certain sites that will be variably enriched with NH4+ and NO3-, with and without supplemental additions of phosphate (P) to produce a range of nutrient supply ratios. Data from the two-pronged approach will be analyzed along with fish community data from the District Department of the Environment to understand the impact on fisheries. Currently, there are regulatory advisories against fishing, and thousands of people fish along the river for sustenance. This project will directly contribute to monitoring the influence of the pre- and post-construction of green and gray infrastructure on local phytoplankton and fish populations and the resulting impacts on local residents who fish in the Anacostia River.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Investigating the microbial abundance and biodiversity of the Anacostia River

ID: 3062
Status: Completed
Start date: May 2016
End Date: August 2017

Description

The Anacostia River is in one of the most densely populated watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin, with over 800,000 residents. As a result, development and associated increases in impervious surfaces cause storm discharges to be flashy, thus enhancing downstream fluxes of nitrogen. In hopes of improving water quality in the Anacostia River, a multi-billion dollar project is underway that will reduce combined sewage overflows, along with many other restoration projects throughout the watershed. However, it is expected that it will take time for these projects to be fully implemented and for the system to respond. Given the increasing number of restoration efforts and investments being made in the watershed, it is essential to understand the effect of nutrients on the microbial community abundance and composition. The overall goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of varying nutrient dynamics (nitrogen & phosphorus) on microbial community composition and productivity as to its impact on higher trophic levels such as fish. Currently, not much is known about which microbes thrive and flourish in the Anacostia River. One way to investigate the biodiversity of the microbial community is through genetic analyses. Water samples will be collected from three sites with distinct nutrient regimes, processed for DNA extraction, then sent off for DNA sequencing. The DNA sequence data will be analyzed using bioinformatics techniques to determine the microbial community abundance and composition.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed


Investigating the water quality of two freshwater ecosystems: The Anacostia River (DC) and the Brainerd Area Lakes (MN)

ID: 2319
Status: Completed
Start date: January 2013
End Date: August 2017

Description

This study examines and compares the water quality of two freshwater systems (Anacostia River, Washington, D.C., and Brainerd Area Lakes, Minn.). The Anacostia River, which recently received a grade of F by the Anacostia Watershed Society for ecosystem health, suffers from uncoordinated monitoring efforts. It currently receives runoff and direct input from D.C.'s combined sewage outfall after periods of heavy rainfall because the system cannot handle the excess amount of water. This input may contain organic nitrogen, which historically has not been monitored closely, and may promote harmful algal blooms. In order to better understand the water quality of the Anacostia River, sampling was done over a year for both inorganic and organic nutrients, as well as phytoplankton composition and responses (nutrient uptake and utilization rates). The second freshwater system focuses on twenty-six north central Minnesota lakes of different degrees of water quality, management, and history. One of the lakes is a Superfund site where a scrapyard was in operation nearby from 1952-1982. Investigation of each lake includes watershed analysis by geographic information system, nutrient analysis, zooplankton population studies, and well water chemical tests. The data provides information for how to change land use practices and how climate change impacts Minnesota lakes.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Bergeron, A., & Lundberg D. J. (2014). Agate Lake report: A comprehensive report on the history of the Agate Lake Superfund clean-up, health of the lake, and recommendations for future work [Report]. Lake Shore, MN: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Agate Lake Association, & MN Pollution Control Agency.

Bergeron, A., Hem, C., Braun, D.C., Arora, G., Solomon, C.M. (2016). Achieving complete cell lysis of Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella vulgaris. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Bergeron, A., Seguin, Z., Van Wey, J., Montgomery K., & Lundberg D. J. (2014). Assessing the health of Brainerd, MN area lakes with GIS watershed analysis, Carlson's Trophic State Index, and pollutants/metals in groundwater. Presented at the meeting of the North America Lake Management Society, Orlando, FL.

Bergeron, A., Seguin, Z., Van Wey, J., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg D.J. (2015). The case of Agate Lake: lake monitoring using Carlson’s trophic state index 30 years after the Environmental Protection Agency’s involvement. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Call, B., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg D.J. (2015). The correlation of zooplankton and total phosphorus in Minnesota lakes. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Call, B., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg D.J. (2015). The correlation of zooplankton and total phosphorus in Minnesota lakes. Presented at the 18th Annual Undergraduate Symposium at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD.

Call, B., Ocampos, J., Vazquez, G., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg D.J. (2015). Agate Lake – water quality, three-dimensional imaging, and zooplankton. Presented at the meeting of the Agate Lake Association, Lake Shore, MN.

Call, B., Ocampos, J., Vazquez, G., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg D.J. (2015). Crow Wing Lake and the quality of its pour-points from its subwatersheds. Presented to the Crow Wing Lake Executive Board at Central Lakes College, Brainerd, MN.

Callahan, K, Salazar, A., Vazquez, G. Solomon, C.M. (2016). Potential Toxicity of Ammonium and its Effect on the Anacostia Phytoplankton Community.  Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Flink I., Haney F., Temple A.J., Lundberg, D.J. (2016). Agate Lake: an update on water quality, mercury concentrations, and shallow groundwater flow. Presented at the meeting of the Agate Lake Association, Lake Shore, MN.

Flores, E., Hines, A., Zager, L., Rubiayat, M., & Solomon, C. M. (2014). Continuous water quality monitoring of the Anacostia River. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Hines, A., Flores, E., Zager, L., Rubiayat, M., & Solomon, C. M. (2014). Response to the Anacostia phytoplankton community to different nutrient treatments. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Humlicek, G., Arora, G., & Solomon, C.M. (2017). Analysis of Bacterial and Algal Diversity in the Anacostia River. Presented at the end of summer internship symposium, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Kyre, C. J., Laucevicius, A., Humlicek, G., Vazquez, G. Arora, G., & Solomon, C.M. (2017). Examining the effect of nutrients on algal communities in the Anacostia River. Presented at the end of summer internship symposium, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Marceaux, B., Prickett, K., & Lundberg, D.J. (2017).  Agate Lake--Water Quality Updates and a Relationship Between Calcium Concentrations and Zebra Mussel Populations.  Presented at the meeting of the Agate Lake Association, Lake Shore, MN.

Marceaux, B., Prickett, K., & Lundberg, D.J. (2017).  Lake Water Quality, Nutrients, Calcium Concentrations/Zebra Mussels, and 3-D Watershed Models: the Work We Do at the Brainerd Lakes Water Resources Laboratory.  Presented at the St. Cloud State University Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory, St. Cloud, MN.

Marceaux, B., Prickett, K., & Lundberg, D.J. (2017).  Science Night at Camp Sertoma.  Presented at Camp Sertoma, East Gull Lake, MN.

Ocampos, J., Jacobi, T., & Lundberg, D.J. (2016).  3D Printing Tuotiral [Handbook].  Distributed to faculty and summer interns to create 3-D watershed models with ArcGIS and a 3D printer.

Ocampos, J., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg D.J. (2015). Using geographic information system (ArcGIS) on lakes in north-central Minnesota.  Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Ocampos, J., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg D.J. (2015). Using geographic information system (ArcGIS) on lakes in north-central Minnesota.  Presented at the 18th Annual Undergraduate Symposium at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD.

Ocampos, J., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg, D.J. (2015).  ArcGIS Tutorial [Handbook].  Distributed to the General Studies Requirement: Scientific & Reasoning in Context (GSR230): Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) students and with summer interns.

Salazar, A, Callahan, K.,  Shangguan, Y. Vazquez. G. Solomon, C.M. (2016). Response of the Microbial Community of the Anacostia River to Different Nutrient Treatments. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Seguin, Z., & Lundberg D. J. (2014). Smith Lake report: A comprehensive report on the health of Smith Lake and recommendations for future work [Report]. Rochester, MN: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources & MN Pollution Control Agency.

Vazquez, G., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg D.J. (2015). Comparing anthropogenic land use, its impact on Agate Lake and Crow Wing Lake.  Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Vazquez, G., Montgomery, K., & Lundberg D.J. (2015). Comparing anthropogenic land use, its impact on Agate Lake and Crow Wing Lake.  Presented at the 18th Annual Undergraduate Symposium at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD.


Investigations of the effect of catalyst loading on cross-metathesis reaction

ID: 1993
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2012
End Date: December 2020

Description

Investigations were carried out using various cross-metathesis catalysts to determine effect of catalyst concentration on the reaction. This has a potential application in chemical, polymer, and pharmaceutical industries, as it could potentially lead to reduced cost of production.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Sabila, P. S. (2015). Styrene cross-metathesis using low catalyst concentrations. Universal Journal of Chemistry, 3(3), 87-90.


NextGen Genome Solver

ID: 3079
Status: Completed
Start date: September 2015
End Date: July 2017

Description

Preparing students for 21st century employment in STEM fields is an important goal for all undergraduate science faculty. The PIs conduct a series of innovative portable workshops at selected sites around the country as a means of providing biology faculty with tools and techniques proven to successfully engage students in research in two rapidly developing fields in biology-bioinformatics and microbial genomics. The research skills practiced at the workshops are accessible to everyone with a computer and an Internet connection, making participation in the project cost-effective for anyone, even at severely resource-limited institutions. Bioinformatics studies facilitate student understanding of evolution, information flow, structure and function, and biological systems. Students exposed to the thinking necessary for tackling bioinformatics problems gain experience in computational analyses and modeling, both important to understanding how human beings and the world around them function and interact. The significance and importance of this project is that it will enhance and expand a previous successful pilot effort to help biology faculty introduce more computational approaches into both introductory and advanced biology courses. A wide spectrum of institutions, ranging from community colleges to highly selective doctoral institutions, will act as hosts or participate in these workshops. This project will add to the research base concerning what is known within science education research about effective approaches to faculty enhancement in undergraduate biology education and what is known about an important concept in biology, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) as a driver of bacterial evolution. The PIs previously developed and implemented the Genome Solver Community of Practice, training faculty via face-to-face workshops conducted at the J. Craig Venter Institute and developing an online forum for communication (http://genomesolver.org). The community developed through that project is exploring the rich DNA data sources emerging from the Human Microbiome Project. The current project, called Genome Solver On-the-Go, greatly expands the reach of the workshops while reducing costs of individual workshops and establishes strong local nodes of expertise that can act as regional catalysts for disseminating the information and skills imparted by the workshops. New features introduced in this phase of the project include engaging faculty and students in a multi-dimensional, community bioinformatics project. Faculty and their students will examine bacteria/phage pairs for evidence of HGT, then submit their data to a centralized curated database. The biological question in the HGT project is not one that can be easily approached by a small number of researchers; understanding the extent to which HGT occurs between bacteriophages and bacteria, and how this drives bacterial evolution, will require many individual contributions to the centralized dataset.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Arora, G. (2016, Janurary). NextGen Genome Solver. Workshop conducted at the Harford Community College, Hardford, CT.

Arora, G. (2016, July). NextGen Genome Solver. Workshop conducted at the meeting of the ASMCUE, Denver, CO.

Kyrillos A, Arora G, Murray B and Rosenwald AG. (2015). The Presence of Phage Orthologous Genes in Helicobacter pylori Correlates with the Presence of the Virulence Factors CagA and VacA. Helicobacter, 21 (3), 226-233


Overcoming barriers to STEM success for deaf undergraduates

ID: 1904
Status: Ongoing
Start date: May 2013
End Date: April 2019

Description

This project provides scholarships to deaf students majoring in biology, chemistry, or mathematics, thereby addressing the severe underrepresentation of deaf individuals in STEM fields by providing a specific plan to prepare them for STEM careers. The goals of this plan are realized through the following objectives: (1) Recruit Deaf students into STEM majors; (2) Provide scholarships to talented deaf STEM students with documented financial need (Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program [S-STEM], funded by the National Science Foundation); (3) Provide individual and group activities to support undergraduate S-STEM Scholars; (4) Assist Deaf S-STEM Scholars in overcoming cultural and linguistic barriers; and (5) Provide support services to deaf S-STEM Scholars to help them ultimately enter STEM careers. Broader impacts result from increasing the number of talented deaf students who choose a STEM major, and increasing the number of deaf STEM majors who are well prepared to enter STEM careers. Deaf S-STEM Scholars interact with deaf mentors and deaf scientists to understand that they truly can make significant contributions to STEM fields. There is a need for replicable best practices in educating deaf undergraduates in STEM disciplines, and this project can help develop such practices. Plans are in place to disseminate these best practices through a variety of venues.

Principal investigators

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Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Overcoming barriers to STEM success for Deaf undergraduates.

ID: 2343
Status: Ongoing
Start date: May 2013
End Date: April 2018

Description

This project provides scholarships to Deaf students majoring in biology, chemistry, or mathematics, thereby addressing the severe under-representation of Deaf individuals in STEM fields by providing a specific plan to prepare Deaf students for STEM careers. The goals of this plan are realized through the following objectives: (1) recruit Deaf students into STEM majors; (2) provide scholarships to talented Deaf STEM students with documented financial need; (3) provide individual and group activities to support undergraduate S-STEM Scholars; (4) assist Deaf S-STEM Scholars in overcoming cultural and linguistic barriers; (5) to provide support services to Deaf S-STEM Scholars to ultimately enter STEM careers. Broader Impacts result from increasing the number of talented Deaf students who choose a STEM major, and increasing the number of Deaf STEM majors who are well prepared to enter STEM careers. Deaf S-STEM Scholars will interact with Deaf mentors and Deaf scientists to understand that they truly can make significant contributions to STEM fields. There is a need for replicable best practices in educating Deaf undergraduates in STEM disciplines, and this project can help develop such practices. Plans are in place to disseminate these best practices through a variety of venues.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Partnership in reduced dimensional materials (PRDM): Preparation of molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials

ID: 1991
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2012
End Date: December 2020

Description

The project worked on developing strategies for the preparation of molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials, which have potential applications in fabrication of electronic devices and semiconductors. Two approaches for synthesis of nanomaterials were explored. The first strategy was successful in depositing molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. The resulting products were analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscope, which produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons and contains information about the sample's surface composition and features. Further analyses are done using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy and Profilometer.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Funding sources

Products

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2012). Nanotechnology helps generate interest in science class, careers. On The Green. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/news/nanoexpress_2012.html

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2012). NSF grant to enhance research at Gallaudet, other universities. On The Green. Retrieved from https://www.gallaudet.edu/news/nsf_grant_enhance_nanotech.html

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2013). Department of Science, Technology, and Mathematics works to narrow gap for Deaf students in STEM fields. On The Green. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/news/stem_mgl_internships.html

Houghton, M., Snyder, H. D., & Sabila, P. S. (2015, August). Growth, characterization and exfoliation of molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials. Presented at the Cornell Center for Materials Research Symposium, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.


Partnerships for material research (PREM)

ID: 1565
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2010
End Date: September 2020

Description

This research is on nanotechnology-related projects at Howard University. Students were able to use lithography to prepare nanotechnology samples. They also had hands-on experience with various instrument techniques, including Scanning Electron Microscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The students synthesized a variety of organic precursors that will be used for the synthesis of nanomaterials by chemical vapor deposition method. Three Gallaudet students participated in an internship under the supervision of Dr. Sabila. This internship also tested a new template that could be used for future research collaborations between Gallaudet and other universities where Deaf and hard of hearing Gallaudet students work in a hearing research environment.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Mbochwa, C., Habtemichael, A., & Sabila, P. (2014, October). Growth of molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. Presented at the Summer Undergradute Research Symposium, University of Maryland-Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD.

Mbochwa, C., Habtemichael, A., &Sabila, P. (2014, September). Growth of molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. Presented at the meeting of the Center for Integrated Quantum Materials, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.

Rupnik, G. (2012) Part C:Synthesis of N-Methoxy β-ketoimines; Precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at the Undergraduate Student Research Symposium, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD.

Sabila, P. (2012). Gallaudet University chemistry majors gain nanotechnology skills in summer internship at Howard University. On the Green Publication. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/News/Chemistry_internships_at_Howard.html

Van Wey, J. (2011). Part A: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Van Wey, J. (2011). Part A: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at the Undergraduate Student Research Symposium, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD.

Zhou Yang, F. (2012). Part B: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Zhou Yang, F. (2012). Part B: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at the Undergraduate Student Research Symposium, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD.


Population genetics of connexin 26 deafness

ID: 765
Status: Ongoing
Start date: January 2010
End Date: January 2018

Description

The researchers aim to explore two anthropological explanations for the high prevalence and mutational diversity of deafness-causing GJB2 mutations in the North American population, as well as the association of specific GJB2 mutations within ethnic groups. The first is heterotic balancing selection, in which GJB2 heterozygotes may have increased fitness, possibly due to resistance to bacillary dysentery. A second explanation is linguistic homogamy, meaning in this case that culturally Deaf individuals have actively sought mates with compatible fluency in signed languages. This mate-selection phenomenon may have begun ~200 years ago with the introduction of signed language in residential schools for the Deaf. The significance of linguistic homogamy in Deaf communities is that in the broader human population, the same mechanism may have driven the inexplicably rapid evolution of FOXP2 and 21 other genes implicated in human speech since their appearance in early humans 100,000-200,000 years ago.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Braun, D. C. (2015, September). Population genetics of Cx26 deafness: Frequency, mutability, history and geography. Presented at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Seminar, Bethesda, MD.

Braun, D. C., Craft, E. A., Herold, B. K., Arnos, K. S., Tekin, M., & Pandya, A. (2014, October). Does genetic hypermutability contribute to the prevalence of connexin 26 deafness? Poster presented at the meeting of the American Society for Human Genetics, San Diego, CA.

Jain, S., Epstein, E., & Braun, D. C. (2014, October). Linguistic homogamy explains the recent increase in phenotypic deafness, but does not predict an increase in frequency of deafness alleles. Poster presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in the Chemical and Biological Sciences, Baltimore, MD.

McBride, C., Chin, J., & Braun, D. C. (2014, October). Practical and inexpensive DNA fingerprinting for undergraduate science majors and high school students. Poster presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in the Chemical and Biological Sciences, Baltimore, MD.


Potential societal impact of advances in genetic deafness

ID: 218
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2003
End Date: September 2018

Description

This project was designed to assess the impact of testing for genes for deafness on the Deaf community and hearing parents of deaf and hard of hearing children. The first goal was to conduct focus groups and perform a survey of these groups to determine the attitudes and concerns related to genetics technologies and advances in the identification of genes for deafness. A second goal is to assess the impact of genetic testing on culturally Deaf couples by measuring its influence on selection of a marriage partner.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed


REU AMI Site

ID: 3072
Status: Ongoing
Start date: February 2015
End Date: February 2018

Description

The Accessible Multimedia Interfaces Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) site program provides students with research experiences that enhance multimedia content accessibility through browser or mobile application interfaces for consumers who have sensory disabilities (deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or low vision). They collaborate with peers and mentors who have sensory disabilities. The diverse teams provide students with the experience and knowledge to recognize the range and complexity of accessibility challenges in accessing multimedia and to evaluate the efficacy of proposed solutions in a unique research environment. Students with sensory disabilities are extremely underrepresented in academics at the graduate level, especially in STEM. The REU site creates a critically needed pipeline of these students for graduate school and encourages them to participate in undergraduate and graduate programs in accessible computing and computer science. The REU student teams learn to identify, analyze, and address unsolved accessibility challenges to multimedia content interfaces. They also learn how to collaborate with diverse peers in an inclusive research environment. They gain experience in designing and producing practical solutions that increase accessibility and usability of multimodal information, especially for consumers with sensory disabilities. They will learn to create and disseminate their research outcomes through seminar training and participation in college and institutional conferences. 

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Synthesis and Characterization of Boc Protected N-n-Pentyl-3-Pyridyl Pyrrolidine Ether

ID: 3392
Status: Completed
Start date: May 2016
End Date: May 2017

Description

To synthesize a series of N-n-alkyl pyridyl ethers, we successfully tested the synthetic procedure by synthesizing Boc protected N-n-pentyl-3-pyridyl pyrrolidine ether using Mitsunobu’s reaction. The compound was characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. Pyridyl ethers have been shown to exhibit high affinity for certain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This make them a potential therapeutic agent for a series of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor linked pathophysiology. The goal of this project is to train student in biomedical research leading to drug discovery and to evaluate the possibility of synthesizing a series of N-n-alkyl pyridyl ethers for further pharmacological studies.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Afomeya Mekonnen, Zachary Davenport, Adebowale Ogunjirin (November 2016). An approach to synthesize and determine the Partition Coefficient of Two Analogs of Pyridyl Ether Compound. Oral presentation at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students at Tampa Convention Center, Tampa, FL.

Davenport, Z., Mekonnen, A., Ogunjirin, A. (2016, November). Synthesis and Characterization of Boc protected N-n-Pentyl-3-pyridyl pyrrolidine ether. Presented at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students at Tampa Convention Center. Tampa, FL.

Davenport, Z.,  Mekonnen, A.,  Ogunjirin, A. (2016, August). Synthesis and Characterization of Boc protected N-n-Pentyl-3-pyridyl pyrrolidine ether. Poster presented at the 19th Undergraduate Research Symposium in the Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Baltimore. Baltimore County, MD. 

Davenport, Z.,  Mekonnen, A.,  Ogunjirin, A. (2016, October). Synthesis and Characterization of Boc protected N-n-Pentyl-3-pyridyl pyrrolidine ether. Poster presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in the Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Baltimore. Baltimore County, MD.


Synthesis of 3-((1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-1-Pentylpyridin-1-ium Bromide

ID: 3393
Status: Completed
Start date: June 2016
End Date: August 2017

Description

This is the first compound of a series of N-n-alkyl pyridyl ethers to be synthesized. A previous study showed that varied chain length of alkyl group can be attached to the nitrogen within the pyridine ring of nicotine. This work explores this claim using the compound 3-((1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy) pyridine as a lead. This research work allows students to have hand-on experience on how to design, synthesize, and characterize novel compounds. The research also leads to the synthesis and discovery of a novel compound that will be tested for selectivity and affinity with the hope that the novel compound will translate into a potential therapeutic agent or a tool for pharmacological research.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Christopher Pasquarelli, Zachary Davenport, Adebowale Ogunjirin (July 2017). Synthesis of 3-((1-methylpyrrolidin-2-yl)methoxy)-1-pentylpyridin-1-ium Bromide. Oral Presentation at the 2017 Summer Research Symposium, July 27-28, 2017 at James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA.


Synthesis of bismuth telluride nanomaterials

ID: 2551
Status: Ongoing
Start date: May 2015
End Date: August 2024

Description

To synthesize nanomaterials of bismuth telluride using chemical exfoliation method. We have successfully used chemical exfoliation to prepare molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials and films. We wanted to see if the same approach could be applied to bulk bismuth telluride to prepared thin films (2-dimensional materials). Bismuth telluride has been shown to exhibit interesting thermoelectric properties that convert heat to electricity. The goal of this project is to design a method for producing bismuth telluride films on silicon wafers. The films will be analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. We are also interested in studying the depth and density of deposited bismuth telluride films on silicon wafers.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Marceaux, B., Snyder, H. D., Sabila, P. S., & Huber, T. (2015, August). Exfoliation of Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). Presented at the Centre for Information Quality Management Research Convocation, MIT, Boston, MA.


Synthesis of N-n-alkylpyridiniumether as a Tobacco cessation agent

ID: 3335
Status: Completed
Start date: November 2016
End Date: September 2017

Description

Cigarette smoking is the single largest preventable cause of deaths and diseases in the United States, but thousands of youths are becoming cigarette smokers daily. Although proven and efficacious pharmacotherapies for tobacco dependence are in the market for management of tobacco addiction, relapse rates continue to be high. Therefore, there is need for alternative and more efficacious therapy. Nicotine is the main addictive substance in tobacco products. Nicotine binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the central nervous system and modulates the release of neurotransmitters. The released neurotransmitters cause a sense of reward in the user. Nicotine acts via many subtypes of nAChRs. Because all these nAChR subtypes are relevant for many physiological processes, small and clinically relevant molecules that can compete with nicotine for binding at nAChR sites need to be subtype selective nAChR ligand. This proposal seeks to develop and discover novel molecules for the treatment of tobacco dependence. The hypothesis is that N-n-Alkylpyridiniumether ions of pyridylethers will displace nicotine from α-conotoxin MII (α-CTXMII) sensitive nAChR binding site, and inhibit release of dopamine from α-CTXMII-sensitive nAChR subtypes.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Scholarship and creative activity

2017

Arora, G. (2017, July). Creating a Community Science Project in Bioinformatics. Presented at the American Society of Microbiology Conference of Undergraduate Educators. Denver, CO.

Arora, G. (2017, June). NextGen Genome Solver. Workshop conducted at the Florida International University. Miami, FL.

Hem, C and Arora, G. (2016, October). Listeria monocytogenes shows evidence of horizontal gene transfer. Presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in University of Maryland. Baltimore County, MD.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (2016, October). Analyzing student learning using bioinformatics course modules as a platform for student engagement in research. Presented at the Young Investigators Meeting. Chicago, IL.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (December 2016). Evidence for Student Learning in Bioinformatics. Presented at the American Society for Cell Biology. San Diego, CA.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (July 2017) Faculty training and student learning in bioinformatics. Presented at the Transforming Research in Undergraduate STEM Education Conference. Minnesota, MN.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (July 2017). Faculty Training and Student Performance Gains in Bioinformatics. Society for the Advancement of Biology Education and Research, Minnesota, MN.

2016

Arora, G. (2016) Genome Solver On-the-Go: Creating Local Support Networks for Bioinformatics Instruction. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Arora, G. (2016). Genome Solver: creating a Community Science Project in Bioinformatics. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Arora, G. (2016). NextGen Genome Solver: Faculty Development in Bioinformatics. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Kyrillos A, Arora G, Murray B and Rosenwald AG. (2015). The Presence of Phage Orthologous Genes in Helicobacter pylori Correlates with the Presence of the Virulence Factors CagA and VacA. Helicobacter, 21 (3), 226-233

Rosenwald, A., Arora, G., Ferrandino, R., Gerace, EL.,Mohammednetej, M., Nosair, W., Ratilla, S., Subic, AZ., Rolfes, R. (2016).Identification of Genes in Candida glabrata Conferring Altered Responses to Caspofungin, a Cell Wall Synthesis Inhibitor. G3, 6 (3), 2893-2907.

2017

Glasser, A., Kushalnagar, K., & Kushalnagar, R. (2017). Feasibility of Using Automatic Speech Recognition with Voices of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Individuals. In The 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 334–336). https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134819

Kushalnagar, P., Ryan, C., Smith, S., & Kushalnagar, R. (2017). Critical health literacy in American deaf college students. Health Promotion International. https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dax022

Kushalnagar, R. S. (2017). Who Owns Captioning? In J. Lazar & M. A. Stein (Eds.), Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology (pp. 182–198). University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc.

Kushalnagar, R. S., Behm, G. W., Ali, S. S., Harvey, S. M., & Bercan, K. G. (2017). Enhancing participation of deaf engineering students in lab discussion. In 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio (pp. 1–6).

Kushalnagar, R., Glasser, A., & Kushalnagar, K. (2017). Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing perspectives on using Automatic Speech Recognition in Conversation. In The 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 292–298). https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134781

Kushalnagar, R., Seita, M., & Glasser, A. (2017). Closed ASL Interpreting for Online Videos. In Proceedings of the 14th Web for All Conference on The Future of Accessible Work - W4A ’17 (pp. 1–4). New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3058555.3058578

Lasecki, W. S., Miller, C. D., Naim, I., Kushalnagar, R., Sadilek, A., Gildea, D., & Bigham, J. P. (2017, November). Scribe: Deep Integration of Human and Machine Intelligence to Caption Speech in Real Time. Communications of the ACM, 8.

2016

Kushalnagar, R. S. (2015). Optimal viewing distance between deaf viewers and interpreters. Journal on Technology and Persons with Disabilities, 3 (22).

Kushalnagar, R. S., Behm, G. W., Kelstone, A. W., & Ali, S. (2015, October). Tracked Speech-To-Text Display: Enhancing Accessibility and Readability of Real-Time Speech-To-Text. In Proceedings of the 17th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers & Accessibility (pp. 223-230). ACM.

Kushalnagar, R. S., Kushalnagar, P., & Haddad, F. (2016, July). SingleScreenFocus for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students. 15th International Conference on Computers Helping People with Special Needs,  (pp. 433-437).Springer International Publishing, New York, NY.

2017

Kushalnagar, P., Smith, S., Hopper, M., Ryan, C., Rinkevich, M., & Kushalnagar, R. S. (2016). Making Cancer Health Text on the Internet Easier to Read for Deaf People Who Use American Sign Language. Journal of Cancer Education, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-016-1059-5

Waller, J. M., & Kushalnagar, R. S. (2016). Evaluation of Automatic Caption Segmentation. In Proceedings of the 18th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility - ASSETS ’16 (pp. 331–332). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/2982142.2982205

2017

Obiedat, M. A Note on the Construction of Complex and Quaternionic Vector Fields on Spheres. Presented at the Joint Mathematics Meetings of the AMS-MAA, Atlanta, GA. 

Obiedat, M. A Note on the Construction of Complex and Quaternionic Vector Fields on Spheres. Journal of Mathematical Notes, 93(1) (2013), 104-110

2016

Sabila, P.  (2015). Incorporation of D/HoH in a Nanotechnology Summer Internship. Presentation at the Fall Material Science Research Society Meeting, Boston, MA.

2017

Marceaux, B., Snyder, H. D., Sabila, P. S. & Huber, T. (March 2016). Exfoliation of Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). Poster presented at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo. Washington, DC.

Mbochwa, C., Habtemichael, A., Sabila, P. (March 2016). Growth of Molybdenum Disulfide Films on Silicon Wafers.  Poster presented at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo. Washington, DC.

Sabila, P. (2016, June) CIQM, PRDM and Gallaudet university: Nanotechnology Research Experience for Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing Students. Lecture presented at Howard University. Washington, DC.

Sabila, P. (March 2016). Dr. Sabila Research at Gallaudet.  Lecture presented during the Research Panel Session at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo. Washington, DC.

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