Research & Scholarly Achievement
at Gallaudet University

Psychology

The Psychology Department provides a rigorous academic and applied curriculum that addresses important core areas of psychology; encourages students to explore the implications of psychological research, theory, and practice; and includes the application of psychology in internship settings. The department also commits itself to producing scholarly work in scientific and applied areas.


A comparative study on emotional regulation differences between deaf children and adolescents raised with deaf versus hearing parents

ID: 3322
Status: Completed
Start date: March 2017
End Date: November 2017

Description

There are many challenges that parents may face when raising a child. One significant difficulty can be a conflict in communication between the parent and child. This can sometimes be a prominent issue in situations where there may be obstacles in communicating language between a hearing parent and deaf child. Such language limitations and possible struggles with communication may have an effect on certain aspects of the child’s development. The current study aims to explore the development of emotional regulation between two groups: deaf individuals with deaf parents, and deaf individuals with hearing parents. The study will assess children and adolescents between ages 7-16 years old through parent surveys. For this study, the questions being asked are: “Is there a significant difference in the emotional regulation skills of deaf children and adolescents raised by deaf parents and deaf children and adolescents raised by hearing parents?” and “Is there is a difference in emotion regulation when participants are analyzed by age?” This study is predicting that emotion regulation skills will change in children over time. Another hypothesis is that deaf children with deaf parents will score as having better emotional regulation skills than deaf children with hearing parents.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Cultural Adaption of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire for Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and DeafBlind People

ID: 3584
Status: Completed
Start date: August 2018
End Date: December 2018

Description

Childhood maltreatment is a critical public health issue, with long-term adverse consequences for survivors and the communities they live in. Most definitions of child maltreatment in research include physical abuse, emotional (or psychological) abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect that occurs in childhood and is perpetuated by a parent or a caregiver. Currently, the literature on childhood maltreatment among Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and DeafBlind (DHHDB) people is scant. In what limited literature that exists, there appears to be evidence for traumas unique to the DHHDB experience, such as communication-related neglect. Yet, due to the lack of available information, there is a need for concentrated efforts to collect accurate and reliable data on childhood maltreatment among DHHDB people. To this end, the proposed research project will explore the validity of two existing measures of childhood experiences -- the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and the PROMIS-Deaf Profile: Early Life Communication Experience domain. At the conclusion of the study, there will be a proposed cultural adaption of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire for use with DHHDB people and recommendations for use of PROMIS-Deaf Profile to screen for communication-related neglect.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Current practice of psychological assessment of deaf and hard of hearing clients: A focus group study

ID: 3511
Status: Completed
Start date: January 2018
End Date: June 2018

Description

Psychological assessment plays a large part in the practice of psychology.  Over the years, steps have been taken towards ensuring ethical and culturally sensitive psychological assessment for cultural and linguistic minorities as well as individuals with disabilities and other underserved populations.  However, assessment of deaf and hard of hearing individuals continues to be problematic due to a variety of reasons, including availability of appropriate measures, lack of appropriate knowledge and training, and vast heterogeneity in characteristics of the deaf and hard of hearing population.  The proposed research aims to further explore results of an in-depth exploratory survey of the practices of clinical and school psychologists who work with deaf and hard of hearing individuals regarding the actual practice of assessment of deaf and hard of hearing individuals (Wilkins, 2017).  The data will be analyzed using thematic analysis in order to develop themes from the reported experiences of focus group participants.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Developing an Understanding of Quality Communication in Families with Hearing Caregivers and a Deaf Child, perceived by the Child

ID: 3025
Status: Completed
Start date: January 2016
End Date: December 2017

Description

In the field of child and family psychology, a hot topic has been the parent-child relationship, and what can possibly improve it. A less common area of study is how quality communication develops within parent-child relationships. Parents of deaf children are often faced with additional obstacles in terms of developing quality communication with their child, namely, the ability to communicate. It is for this reason that the previously established definitions of quality communication and what it entails may not be appropriate to define the relationship between deaf children and hearing parents. The proposed study is an exploratory study to gain insight into what quality communication could possibly look like in these families, as perceived by a deaf child.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


The diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in college-aged Deaf individuals: Exploring the accuracy of the Barkley Adult ADHD rating scale-IV and the Attention Deficit Scales for Adults, Sign Language Version

ID: 2371
Status: Completed
Start date: October 2013
End Date: December 2017

Description

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), which has been found to impair one's social, familial, scholastic, and occupational adjustment, is one of the most comprehensively examined neurodevelopmental disorders. For deaf individuals, language and executive functioning have important implications for cognitive and academic functioning, but it is not clear to what extent cognitive and academic functioning are impacted in Deaf individuals with ADHD, as the amount of research conducted with deaf individuals with ADHD has been limited, especially within the realm of deaf adults. There are many areas that need to be explored in relation to ADHD, executive dysfunction, deaf individuals, and language acquisition/secondary language delay. Before these areas can be formally studied, however, the ADHD diagnostic process in deaf individuals needs to be investigated. A clear diagnostic classification of deaf individuals with ADHD must be demonstrated to ensure a distinction between deaf individuals with ADHD and those without ADHD. This study will examine the ADHD diagnostic evaluation process with college-aged deaf individuals. Specifically, this study will explore whether or not the Barkley Adult ADHD rating scale-IV and the Attention Deficit Scales for Adults, Sign Language Version, can clearly distinguish those who identify having a prior diagnosis of ADHD compared to those who do not self-identify or have a previous diagnosis of ADHD. In addition, the study will explore the potential influences of executive dysfunction and language acquisition/secondary language delay in deaf individuals on the ADHD diagnostic process. 

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System, 4th edition: Interrater reliability with live coding versus video coding

ID: 3386
Status: Ongoing
Start date: January 2017

Description

Recently, studies have been conducted on the feasibility of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) with families that include at least one deaf family member. The results have shown success with adapted PCIT. The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) in ASL using data from families who have participated in PCIT conducted in ASL. The DPICS is a system of coding parent and child verbalizations to track parent mastery of skill and child compliance.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


Have you talked about it? A phenomenological approach to deaf women’s lived experience of sexual assault disclosure

ID: 3330
Status: Completed
Start date: January 2017
End Date: January 2018

Description

Deaf women experience sexual assault at a significantly higher rate than the general hearing population. Yet, within the Deaf community there is a dearth of research regarding disclosure patterns – the act of telling someone about a personal experience of sexual assault. This descriptive phenomenological study seeks to explore the disclosure experiences among three-to-six adult Deaf female survivors following methods established by Giorgi (2009). Semi-structured interviews will be used to gain a rich understanding of the lived disclosure experiences unique to each survivor. Specifically, survivors will be asked to provide detailed descriptions of their experiences receiving reactions from various support providers. These phenomenological methods include understanding the psychological meaning of survivors’ experiences of disclosure reactions by understanding the essential and general structures of this phenomenon. It is hoped that results will offer insight into the psychological complexity of the disclosure process in the Deaf community in order to better serve survivors and their support providers in the future.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


The Interaction Between Personality and Exercise in Predicting Perceived Stress

ID: 3325
Status: Completed
Start date: February 2017
End Date: May 2018

Description

Stress has been deemed an epidemic in modern society, and has been connected to several mental and physical health conditions. While research has shown that exercise may be effective at relieving stress, and personality tends to predict perceived stress, little is known about the connection between perceived stress, exercise, and personality. The purpose of the current study is to explore the relationship among these variables and to determine how personality and exercise can be used to predict perceived stress. It is hoped that the findings may lead to more effective exercise prescriptions, as well our understanding of the mechanisms underlying exercise-induced stress reduction.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Media Objectification and Implicit Gender Bias

ID: 3073
Status: Ongoing
Start date: May 2016
End Date: December 2019

Description

This project evaluates the effects of sexually objectifying advertisements placed in the context of news stories about men and women in positions of power. The studies in this project use experimental design to examine the effects of the objectifying ads on implicit gender bias.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed


Parents' Perspectives of Their Deaf Child's School Experience in Malaysia

ID: 3327
Status: Completed
Start date: January 2017
End Date: July 2018

Description

This study aims to explore the childhood school experience of deaf Malaysian adults as perceived by their parents. While Aftar (2016) explored the school experience of deaf Malaysians from the perspectives of deaf individuals, this study will attempt to further expand this area of research by interviewing the parents and providing a better understanding of the implementation or effectiveness of deaf education in Malaysia. The outcome of this research will hopefully contribute to the existing literature and reveal a deeper understanding of what the school experience is like for deaf students in Malaysia. This study will be conducted qualitatively using a phenomenological approach and framed within a constructivist paradigm viewpoint. The constructivist paradigm assumes that reality is socially constructed. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted in spoken Malay or English, and transcribed data will be analyzed qualitatively by identifying emerging themes.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


Peer support and food security in deaf college students

ID: 3342
Status: Completed
Start date: March 2017
End Date: December 2017

Description

Food insecurity is a danger to college students all over the country, and it impacts their life in many ways. In particular, food insecurity can result in educational consequences such as lower performance in classes, difficulty concentrating, and insufficient health in college students. These outcomes can be quite detrimental for some deaf college students who are already at risk for poorer health outcomes associated with low access to incidental information about health. The prevalence of food security in deaf college student population has not been investigated. A protective factor that may reduce the impact of food insecurity on these college-related outcomes is peer support, which was previously reported as a significant and direct predictor of health. The proposed study may portray a relationship between peer support and deaf college students' food security experiences. If a significant relationship is found, then this calls for a greater emphasis on the importance friends have in deaf people’s lives. Peer support could potentially offset the negative consequences deaf people’s experience with food insecurity. In addition to peer support, food programs designed for those who are at risk for food insecurity may benefit students and the university as a whole.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


A Survey Study of Deaf Adults' Media Use and Body Image

ID: 3323
Status: Completed
Start date: April 2017
End Date: September 2018

Description

Previous research has documented associations between media use and body image among young adult men and women. Less research has examined associations between media use and body image among deaf adults. The proposed study would collect survey data from deaf and hard-of-hearing adults about their media use, with a focus on television and social media. Results will be used to examine links between body image and exposure to and identification with various deaf and hearing media models. Funds are requested to compensate participants for completing the survey.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources


The Therapeutic Power of Play: Play Therapy Training Experiences of Mental Health Professionals with Deaf Clients

ID: 3387
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2016

Description

Children of all walks of life experience trauma, exhibit socioemotional challenges, and display behavioral symptoms that lead their caregivers to seek mental health services. Deaf and hard of hearing children experience these difficulties at an alarmingly higher rate than the general hearing population. While a practitioner should exist for every child who needs play therapy, there are not enough mental health professionals who are trained in both play therapy and working with deaf and hard of hearing clients. A considerable amount of research exists covering the efficacy of play therapy training models; however, research is not full-bodied when looking at the best training methods applicable for practitioners who may encounter a deaf or hard of hearing client. The purpose of the proposed qualitative study is to explore play therapy training experiences of mental health professionals who have used play therapy with deaf and/or hard of hearing clients. Questions explore experiences and perceptions of mental health professionals regarding their play therapy training and their training experiences related to the deaf population.

 

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


Scholarship and creative activity

2018

Fedlan, D.A., Brice, P. (2018). Hard of Hearing Adults: Implications of the Between Group Status. Gallaudet Chronicles of Psychology.

2018

Miller, B. D. (2017, November). Assessment for students with hearing loss: How to interpret data to make informed decisions. Presented at the annual conference of HELIX: High Expectations for Students with Low Incidence Disabilities, State College, PA

Miller, B. D. (2018). Utility of curriculum-based approaches for students with hearing loss. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1177/1525740118766477

2017

Gibbons, E. (2016, October).  Contemplative Practices in the Multicultural Curriculum Transformation Process. Poster session presented at the eighth annual meeting of the Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education, Amherst, MA.

Gibbons, E. (2017, February).  Know sweat: Hyperhidrosis and social anxiety in youth.  Paper session presented at the meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, San Antonio, TX.

  • Filed under KOO

2017

Koo, D., Pick, LH, & Garrido-Nag, K. (2016). Neurolinguistics: Cortex imaging. In G. Gertz & P. Boudreault (Eds.), The SAGE Deaf Studies Encyclopedia (pp.712-715). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.  DOI: 10.4135/9781483346489.n223

2017

Miller, B. D.  (2017). Assessment for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.  Presentation for the Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA

2017

Paludneviciene, R. (2016, October).  Efficacy of Video Lectures as Supplementary Materials for English Language Learners.  Poster presented at the International Society of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning conference, Los Angeles, CA. 

2017

Pick, LH., Aldalur, A., Garrido-Nag, K., & Koo, D. (2016). American Sign Language story recall among Deaf young adults. Poster presented at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, Colorado. 

2017

Miller, B. D.  (2017). Assessment for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.   Presentation for the Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA

Valid HTML 5 Valid CSS 3 WAVE (WebAIM) Approved
[Logo]