Research & Scholarly Achievement
at Gallaudet University


Students Actively Engaged in Research

Research at Gallaudet University strives to involve students in ways that benefits their minds and also advances the pursuit of new understandings and knowledge. From serving as assistants for faculty investigators to the carrying out of their own study, students are major contributors in the vitality of campus research scholarship. With scientific inquiry often provoking more and more questions, and thereby revealing the complexity of our world, self-motivated students learn to challenge received information. Accordingly, many academic programs have classes that require research projects as a final project or as the focus of the entire course. Through active inquiry, students get a chance to apply theories and knowledge from their classes in a way that helps them to make connections to real situations and practice. Such critical approach to thinking can propel a deeper insight into their chosen field—and solidify their foundation for a promising career in the knowledge-based fields.

Engaging students in research benefits not only them, but the professional fields as well. Young minds may approach problems in new ways. Gaining the insight of younger Deaf and hard of hearing people is essential to many topics of concern to Gallaudet in particular. Across the university, there are a growing number of "hot spots" of student researchers working on studies from the physical sciences to social sciences to deafness-related disciplines. Student research assistants play vital roles in collecting responses from diverse participants, analyzing raw data, and presenting findings. Across the university, there are a growing number of "hot spots" of student researchers working on studies from the physical sciences to social sciences to deafness-related disciplines. The university encourages student involvement in research activity through graduate assistantships, hiring under external grants, and direct funding of student research. In addition, research internships are being made available to students, through various departments such as the Interpretation Department. One promising development is the extent of student-initiated, student-led research activity. At the pinnacle of student contribution to knowledge is the doctoral dissertation; a list of dissertations completed by Gallaudet students in FY 2017 is shown below.

Dissertations completed in FY 2017

Ferracuti, R. (2017). An examination of Deaf clients' boundary expectations related to personal and professional boundaries in ASL-English interpretation (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Gala, N.M. (2017).  Emotional display rules of Deaf culture: An evaluation of emotional expression (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Hwang, Y. (2016). Nature of peer dialogue based on dramatic instruction (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Stone, A. (2017). Neural systems for infant sensitivity to phonological rhythmic-temporal patterning (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Thornton, C. (2017). The status of palm orientation in the phonological representation of American Sign Language (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Turner Dougherty, A.C. (2017) Resilience in children who are deaf with additional disabilities: the role of the parent-child relationship in child social skills (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Williams, L.  (2016). Exploring the hegemonic whiteness in sign language interpreter education program curricula: A discussion with program directors, faculty, and students (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Wright, S.J. (2017) From Deaf to Deaf-Blind: A phenomenological study of the lived experiences of Deaf-Blind individuals in the Deep South (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Joharchi, H.A. (2017). Negotiating access to mental health services: Deaf people with immigrant roots (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Marchut, A.E. (2017). Persistence of Deaf undergraduate students in science, engineering, and mathematics programs (Doctoral dissertation).  Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

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