Research & Scholarly Achievement
at Gallaudet University

Science, Technology, and Mathematics

Research challenges faculty and students to transform learning, observations, and ideas into new solutions and products. This unit has active research in nanotechnology, remote sensing, limnology, pharmacognosy, organic synthesis, and biomedical areas. Mentored research, university collaborations, and internships provide students experience for work, advanced degrees, and medical/pharmaceutical professional careers.


Computational Investigation of Ataxia Disease-Causing Mutations

ID: 3612
Status: Ongoing
Start date: February 2017
End Date: October 2019

Description

Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that causes progressive damage to the nervous system. Initial symptoms include poor coordination and often times it causes scoliosis or heart disease and diabetes. Currently, there is no cure for Friedreich's Ataxia. Our research aims to understand how DNA variations cause the disease. There are numerous fast computational methods that can be used for this purpose. However, they are not accurate enough and cannot be relied on. We hypothesize that if the current fast methods can be used in conjunction with smart conformational search, the accuracy can be significantly increased. We use replica-exchange molecular dynamics to generate different conformations of the frataxin protein and then use those conformational with current fast methods. After that we compare our results with known experimental values and iteratively improve the conformational search until we develop a method that is both efficient (fast) and accurate. Once the method is completed, it will be applicable to studying other inherited monogenic (caused by single DNA mutation) diseases.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed


Designing Serious Games for Chemistry

ID: 3613
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2017
End Date: October 2020

Description

Blended learning techniques such as game-based learning has always been viewed as an effective tool in various levels from grade school to higher education. However, despite the popularity of gaming in youth and its potential in student engagement and motivation, it has not been exploited extensively particularly in higher education. With these in mind, we develop 'serious games' to be used in chemistry (and possibly other) courses to increase student engagement and motivation, and eventually the learning. Recently, we designed the "PChem Challenge Game" with rather ancient 'snakes and ladders' game mechanics in mind, but transforming it into a unique blend of pure luck and knowledge. The game now is part of the curriculum at Gallaudet and currently, we are testing its efficacy in different institutions across the country. Similarly, the project is being extended to other courses at Gallaudet. An unexpected benefit of the approach has been that it helps improve students' technical ASL since the game requires players to read questions for other players and provide clues when needed.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed


Experiences of LGBTQIA-Identified Faculty in Biology Classrooms

ID: 3061
Status: Completed
Start date: September 2015
End Date: December 2018

Description

Individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA) make up an estimated 3.6% of the overall U.S. population. As a group, LGBTQIA individuals have been thought to be historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), but few empirical studies have been done. We know very little about LGBTQIA instructors in STEM. This study seeks to understand what LGBTQIA biology faculty perceive to be advantages, disadvantages, barriers, challenges, benefits, and opportunities of coming out on campus and the role of their identity in their professional lives.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Brownell, S., C. Gormally, K. Cooper. (2017) Coming out in life (sciences): LGBTQIA instructors' experiences in biology. Poster, National Association for Research in Science Teaching, San Antonio, TX.


REU Accessible Information and Communications Technologies

ID: 3610
Status: Ongoing
Start date: January 2018
End Date: February 2020

Description

The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site on Accessible Information and Communication Technology (AICT) provides undergraduate participants with research experiences on projects that enhance accessibility of information and communication technologies, such as mobile phones or streaming videos for consumers who are deaf, hard of hearing, or deaf-blind (DHHDB). The participants will collaborate with DHHDB peers and mentors on a research project for 10 weeks. The diverse teams provide students with the experience and knowledge to recognize the range and complexity of accessibility challenges in accessing information and communication technology and to evaluate the efficacy of proposed solutions in a unique research environment. DHHDB students are extremely underrepresented in academics at the graduate level especially in STEM. The AICT REU site creates a critically needed pipeline of these students for graduate school and encourages them to participate in undergraduate and graduate programs in accessible information and communications technology. Each research project addresses unsolved accessibility challenges for deaf, hard of hearing or deaf-blind consumers in using existing information and communication technology that undergraduate researchers can easily understand, analyze and solve. The inclusion of undergraduate and faculty researchers who have aural disabilities increases accessibility and usability of information and communication technologies. The interactive and personal nature of the research projects provides a link between research and practice, and a diverse, inclusive and collaborative research experience for the participants. They will learn to create and disseminate their research outcomes through seminar training and participation in college and institutional conferences. The AICT REU Site website (http://accessiblemultimedia.com) provides additional information.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Kushalnagar, R.S., Behm, G. W., Wolfe, K.W., Yeung, P., Dingman, B., Ali, S., Glasser, A., and Ryan, C. (2018). RTTD-ID: Tracked Captions with Multiple Speakers for Deaf Students. Proceedings of the 125th ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. 24 June, Salt Lake City, UT. ASEE Conferences. https://peer.asee.org/30945

Kushalnagar, R.S. and Behm, G.W. (2018). A Transition Community for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Engineering Programs. Proceedings of the 125th ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. 24 June, Salt Lake City, UT. ASEE Conferences. https://peer.asee.org/29742

Jain, Dhruv and Chinh, Bonnie and Findlater, Leah and Kushalnagar, Raja and Froehlich, Jon. Exploring Augmented Reality Approaches to Real-Time Captioning: A Preliminary Autoethnographic Study, Proceedings of the 2018 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, 2018. doi:10.1145/3197391.3205404

Bragg, D. K., Kushalnagar, R.S. and Ladner R. E. (2018). Designing an Animated Character System for American Sign Language. Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '18. 22 October, Galway, Ireland. ACM Press.

Jain, D., Franz, R., Findlater, L., Cannon, J., Kushalnagar, R.S. and Froehlich, J.E. (2018). Towards Accessible Conversations in a Mobile Context for People who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '18. 22 October, Galway, Ireland. ACM Press.

Kushalnagar, R. and Kushalnagar, K. (2018). SubtitleFormatter: Making Subtitles Easier to Read for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Viewers on Personal Devices. Proceedings of the Computers Helping People with Special Needs – ICCHP 2018. 14 July, Vienna, Austria. Springer-Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94277-3_35


Advancing students' science literacy

ID: 2340
Status: Completed
Start date: August 2013
End Date: December 2018

Description

The goal of this study is to advance students' science literacy and improve biology laboratory courses. Becoming science literate involves developing skills related to accessing science information beyond the classroom. However, science literacy is more than science knowledge and skills. Science literacy also involves seeing oneself as capable of engaging with science -- or being a "science person" -- and seeing science in everyday life. With positive attitudinal growth, students are more likely to engage with science outside of class. Using a mixed methods approach, the project focuses on learning about students' self-conception as a science person and attitudes about science influence science literacy development. The study focuses on learning how teaching practices can foster positive growth in students' attitudes toward science. The project will uncover student-informed strategies to cultivate students' affinities for science. Findings will be used to improve undergraduate science learning.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Gormally, C. and A. Marchut. (2017, Janurary). "Science isn't my thing:" Exploring non-science majors' science identities. Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilitie, Vol 20:1.

Gormally, C. and A. Marchut. (2016, July). "Science isn't my thing:" Exploring non-science majors' science identities. Poster presented at the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER), Minneapolis, MN.

Gormally, C. and A. Marchut. (2016, March) "Science isn't my thing:" Exploring non-science majors' science identities. Poster presented at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo, Washington, DC.

Gormally, C., Sullivan, C. S., & Szeinbaum, N. (2016). Uncovering Barriers to Teaching Assistants (TAs) Implementing Inquiry Teaching: Inconsistent Facilitation Techniques, Student Resistance, and Reluctance to Share Control over Learning with Students. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education, 17(2), 215–224.

Gormally, C. and A. Marchut. (2017). Inquiry-based laboratories & affective learning outcomes: do these labs improve students' attitudes toward science and science identities? Poster presented at the Gallaudet University Research Expo, Washington, DC.

Marchut, A. and C. Gormally (2017). Successes and limitations of inquiry-based laboratories on affective learning outcomes for deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing signing students. Poster presented at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, San Antonio, TX.

Gormally, C. (2017, Spring). Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Signing Undergraduates' Attitudes toward Science in Inquiry-Based Biology Laboratory Classes.CBE-Life Sciences Education; 16:1.


Partnership in reduced dimensional materials (PRDM): Preparation of molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials

ID: 1991
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2012
End Date: December 2020

Description

The project worked on developing strategies for the preparation of molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials, which have potential applications in fabrication of electronic devices and semiconductors. Two approaches for synthesis of nanomaterials were explored. The first strategy was successful in depositing molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. The resulting products were analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscope, which produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons and contains information about the sample's surface composition and features. Further analyses are done using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy and Profilometer.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Funding sources

Products

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2012). Nanotechnology helps generate interest in science class, careers. On The Green. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/news/nanoexpress_2012.html

Houghton, M., Snyder, H. D., & Sabila, P. S. (2015, August). Growth, characterization and exfoliation of molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials. Presented at the Cornell Center for Materials Research Symposium, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2013). Department of Science, Technology, and Mathematics works to narrow gap for Deaf students in STEM fields. On The Green. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/news/stem_mgl_internships.html

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2012). NSF grant to enhance research at Gallaudet, other universities. On The Green. Retrieved from https://www.gallaudet.edu/news/nsf_grant_enhance_nanotech.html


Modeling Ion Permeation in Wild-Type and Mutant Human α7 nAChR Ion Channels

ID: 3614
Status: Completed
Start date: August 2016
End Date: November 2018

Description

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a cation-selective ion channel activated by binding to a neurotransmitter. Once activated, ions channels provide the communication between the cell and its environment by providing a low energy pathway for ion flow. Dysfunction in nAChR is associated with several neurological diseases including Alzheimer's, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Molecular dynamics simulations of wild type and two mutant (T248F and L251T) human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) have been performed. The channel transmembrane domains were modeled from the closed channel structure from torpedo ray (PDB ID 2BG9) and embedded in DPPC lipid bilayers, surrounded by physiological saline solution. An external electric field was used to obtain stable open channel structures. The adaptive biasing force (ABF) method was used to obtain potential of mean force (PMF) profiles for Na+ ion translocation through the wild type and mutant receptors. Based on the geometry and PMF profiles, the channel gate was found to be at one of the two hydrophobic conserved regions (V249-L251) near the lower end of the channel. The L251T mutation reduced the energetic barrier by 1.9 kcal/mol, consistent with a slight increase in the channel radius in the bottleneck region. On the other hand, the T248F mutation caused a significant decrease in the channel radius (0.4 ˚A) and a substantial increase of 3.9 kcal/mol in the energetic barrier. Ion permeation in all three structures was compared and found to be consistent with barrier height values. Using an external field in an incrementally increasing manner was found to be an effective way to obtain stable open, conducting channel structures.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed


Bismuth Telluride and Molybdenum Disulfide Nanomaterials

ID: 3484
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2016
End Date: October 2020

Description

This project aims to develop a protocol for large scale synthesis of molybdenum disulfide and bismuth telluride nanomaterials using the chemical exfoliation method.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Lalescu, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, Summer) Introduction to ASL and Deaf Culture. Presented at Howard University, Washington, DC.

Lalescu, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, Summer) Introduction to ASL and Deaf Culture. Presented at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P.; Huber, T. Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). (2017, August). Lecture presentation at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Lalescu, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, August). Exfoliation of Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) using n-butyllithium. Lecture presentation at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Mbochwa, C., Sabila, P., Snyder, H. D., Huber, T & Johnson, S. (2016, October). The Effects of Reaction time and Solvent System on MoS2 Exfoliation. Poster presented at the 2016 Undergraduate Research Symposium at the University of Maryland-Baltimore campus, Baltimore, MD.


Partnerships for material research (PREM)

ID: 1565
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2010
End Date: September 2020

Description

This research is on nanotechnology-related projects at Howard University. Students were able to use lithography to prepare nanotechnology samples. They also had hands-on experience with various instrument techniques, including Scanning Electron Microscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The students synthesized a variety of organic precursors that will be used for the synthesis of nanomaterials by chemical vapor deposition method. Three Gallaudet students participated in an internship under the supervision of Dr. Sabila. This internship also tested a new template that could be used for future research collaborations between Gallaudet and other universities where Deaf and hard of hearing Gallaudet students work in a hearing research environment.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Mbochwa, C., Habtemichael, A., & Sabila, P. (2014, October). Growth of molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. Presented at the Summer Undergradute Research Symposium, University of Maryland-Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD.

Rupnik, G. (2012) Part C:Synthesis of N-Methoxy β-ketoimines; Precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at the Undergraduate Student Research Symposium, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD.

Van Wey, J. (2011). Part A: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Zhou Yang, F. (2012). Part B: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Sabila, P. (2012). Gallaudet University chemistry majors gain nanotechnology skills in summer internship at Howard University. On the Green Publication. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/News/Chemistry_internships_at_Howard.html

Mbochwa, C., Habtemichael, A., &Sabila, P. (2014, September). Growth of molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. Presented at the meeting of the Center for Integrated Quantum Materials, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.

Zhou Yang, F. (2012). Part B: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at the Undergraduate Student Research Symposium, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD.

Van Wey, J. (2011). Part A: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at the Undergraduate Student Research Symposium, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD.


Computer Simulations to Understand Disease Mechanisms

ID: 3390
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2016

Description

This project utilizes multiscale computer simulation methods to understand Mendelian disease mechanisms at the molecular level. Computer simulations use the tools of math and physics to solve problems in chemistry, biology, and medicine. Mendalian diseases are monogenic disorders caused by a variation in one gene and sometimes run in families. In general, these are rare genetic disorders with no cure. Our approach is to understand how a single variation in a single gene can cause a disease at the molecular level. This is done by simulations of the natural and variant proteins and comparing various properties. Once we understand the effects of single variations, our next step is to possibly design drugs to reverse the harmful effects. Currently, computer simulations are being run in our HPC Limulus supercomputer, as well as Clemson Palmetto Supercomputing cluster through our collaboration.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017). A Whone New Virtual World: Computational Chemistry. Presented at Gallaudet University Research Expo, Washington, DC.

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017). Effects of Rett Syndrome Mutations on MeCP2 Stability and Binding to DNA. Presented at International Conference on GEnomic Medicine, Baltimore, MD.


Incorporating Original Research into Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum

ID: 3615
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2017
End Date: October 2020

Description

Incorporating original research into undergraduate chemistry courses is still in infancy despite the fact that it has a great potential to promote the 21st century skills such as collaboration, critical thinking, and problem-solving. Integrating research into classroom teaching also expected to stir deep learning through inquiry as well as leading to better student engagement. Within the context of this project, we develop and test original research projects suitable for undergraduate teaching at various levels. One such project was applied in a first semester physical chemistry course in Fall 2017. Besides longer-term benefits described above, the original research incorporated in the classroom sparked an immediate interest in pursuing further research in one of the students. Also, we report the challenges such as finding a suitable research problem, adjusting the difficulty and dividing the work evenly among students. Currently, we are in collaboration or looking for collaborating with faculty in science, math and computer fields to develop similar original research to be incorporated in their classrooms.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017, July). Integrating Original Research in Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Curriculum. Presented at the meeting of Counsel on Undergraduate Research Biennial Conference, Arlington, VA.


Assessing the effectiveness of the Anacostia River tunnel in reduction of eutrophication

ID: 3588
Status: Ongoing
Start date: February 2018
End Date: January 2020

Description

The Anacostia River is among the most polluted tributaries in Chesapeake Bay. With substantial algal blooms and bacterial contamination, it has placed those who recreate on the water at considerable health risk. A recently completed, and soon to be fully implemented multi-billion dollar infrastructure project, has been completed to retain and divert sewage and storm water effluent, with the goal of improving water quality in this important river. This project will address the hypothesis that the diversion of water and its associated nutrients will lead to an improvement in water quality, a shift in the community composition of phytoplankton species, and a reduction in sewage-associated bacteria. Building on a considerable body of work on baseline conditions over the past few years, this project will bring new seasonal water column measurements, enclosure enrichment studies, and molecular approaches to determine if, indeed, a success story can be written. We will use established relationships with the Anacostia Riverkeeper and the Anacostia Waterfront Trust to communicate with community groups via meetings, social media, and the local press, and implement a citizen science program to allow for rapid response regarding water safety.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Peck, C., Orozco, M., Gliech, S., Lin, M., Glibert, P.M., Solomon, C.M. (2018). Influence of different N, P and Si additions on urea utilization pathways in an Anacostia River phytoplankton community. Presented at End of Summer Internship Presentations, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.


Scholarship and creative activity

2016

Sabila, P. (2015). Incorporation of D/HoH in a Nanotechnology Summer Internship. Presentation at the Fall Material Science Research Society Meeting, Boston, MA.

2017

Marceaux, B., Snyder, H. D., Sabila, P. S. & Huber, T. (March 2016). Exfoliation of Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). Poster presented at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo. Washington, DC.

Sabila, P. (2016, June) CIQM, PRDM and Gallaudet university: Nanotechnology Research Experience for Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing Students. Lecture presented at Howard University. Washington, DC.

Sabila, P. (March 2016). Dr. Sabila Research at Gallaudet. Lecture presented during the Research Panel Session at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo. Washington, DC.

Mbochwa, C., Habtemichael, A., Sabila, P. (March 2016). Growth of Molybdenum Disulfide Films on Silicon Wafers. Poster presented at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo. Washington, DC.

2018

Halpern, J., Huber, T., Sinex, S., Johnson, S., Sabila, P., & Mbochwa, C. (2018). Building a Dynamic University-Community College Partnership: The Second Decade of a Broad, Mutually Beneficial Materials Science Collaboration. MRS Advances, 3(12), 637-642. doi:10.1557/adv.2018.203

Halpern,J.; Huber, T.; Sinex, S.; Johnson, S.; and Sabila,P. (2017 November). Building a Dynamic University-Community College Partnership: The Second Decade of a Broad, Mutually Beneficial Materials Science Collaboration. Symposium at Community College and University Partnerships as Catalysts for Promoting Materials Science Education at 2017 MRS, Boston, MA.

2017

Kushalnagar, R. S. (2017). Who Owns Captioning? In J. Lazar & M. A. Stein (Eds.), Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology (pp. 182–198). University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc.

Kushalnagar, R. S., Behm, G. W., Ali, S. S., Harvey, S. M., & Bercan, K. G. (2017). Enhancing participation of deaf engineering students in lab discussion. In 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio (pp. 1–6).

Lasecki, W. S., Miller, C. D., Naim, I., Kushalnagar, R., Sadilek, A., Gildea, D., & Bigham, J. P. (2017, November). Scribe: Deep Integration of Human and Machine Intelligence to Caption Speech in Real Time. Communications of the ACM, 8.

Kushalnagar, R., Glasser, A., & Kushalnagar, K. (2017). Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing perspectives on using Automatic Speech Recognition in Conversation. In The 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 292–298). https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134781

Kushalnagar, R., Seita, M., & Glasser, A. (2017). Closed ASL Interpreting for Online Videos. In Proceedings of the 14th Web for All Conference on The Future of Accessible Work - W4A '17 (pp. 1–4). New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3058555.3058578

Glasser, A., Kushalnagar, K., & Kushalnagar, R. (2017). Feasibility of Using Automatic Speech Recognition with Voices of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Individuals. In The 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 334–336). https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134819

Kushalnagar, P., Ryan, C., Smith, S., & Kushalnagar, R. (2017). Critical health literacy in American deaf college students. Health Promotion International. https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dax022

2017

Obiedat, M. A Note on the Construction of Complex and Quaternionic Vector Fields on Spheres. Journal of Mathematical Notes, 93(1) (2013), 104-110

Obiedat, M. A Note on the Construction of Complex and Quaternionic Vector Fields on Spheres. Presented at the Joint Mathematics Meetings of the AMS-MAA, Atlanta, GA.

2016

Arora, G. (2016). Genome Solver: creating a Community Science Project in Bioinformatics. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Arora, G. (2016). NextGen Genome Solver: Faculty Development in Bioinformatics. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Kyrillos A, Arora G, Murray B and Rosenwald AG. (2015). The Presence of Phage Orthologous Genes in Helicobacter pylori Correlates with the Presence of the Virulence Factors CagA and VacA. Helicobacter, 21 (3), 226-233

Rosenwald, A., Arora, G., Ferrandino, R., Gerace, EL.,Mohammednetej, M., Nosair, W., Ratilla, S., Subic, AZ., Rolfes, R. (2016).Identification of Genes in Candida glabrata Conferring Altered Responses to Caspofungin, a Cell Wall Synthesis Inhibitor. G3, 6 (3), 2893-2907.

Arora, G. (2016) Genome Solver On-the-Go: Creating Local Support Networks for Bioinformatics Instruction. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

2018

Abraham T. Glasser, Kesavan R. Kushalnagar & Raja S. Kushalnagar. (2017). Feasibility of Using Automatic Speech Recognition with Voices of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Individuals. Presented at the 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '17. 26 October, Baltimore, MD, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134819

Dhruv Jain, Bonnie Chinh, Raja Kushalnagar, Leah Findlater and Jon E. Frohlich. (2018). Exploring Augmented Reality Approaches to Real-Time Captioning: A Preliminary Autoethnographic Study. Presented at the 12th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems - DIS 2018. 9 June, Hong Kong, CN. ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3197391.3205404

Kushalnagar, R. and Behm, G. (2018). A Transition Community for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Engineering Programs.Presented at the n 125th ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. 24 June, Salt Lake City, UT. ASEE Conferences. https://peer.asee.org/29742

Danielle K. Bragg, Raja S. Kushalnagar and Richard E. Ladner. (2018). Designing an Animated Character System for American Sign Language. Presented at the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '18, Galway, Ireland. ACM Press.

Abraham T. Glasser, Kesavan R. Kushalnagar & Raja S. Kushalnagar. (2017). Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing perspectives on using Automatic Speech Recognition in Conversation. In 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '17. 22 October, Baltimore, MD, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134781

Kushalnagar, R. and Kushalnagar, K. (2018). SubtitleFormatter: Making Subtitles Easier to Read for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Viewers on Personal Devices. Presented at the Computers Helping People with Special Needs – ICCHP 2018. 14 July, Vienna, Austria. Springer-Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94277-3_35

Jain, D.; Franz,R., Findlater,L.; Cannon,J.; Kushalnagar, R. and Froehlich, J (2018). Towards Accessible Conversations in a Mobile Context for People who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Presemted at the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '18. 22 October, Galway, Ireland. ACM Press.

Kushalnagar,R.; Behm,G., Wolfe,K.,Yeung, P., Dingman, B., Ali,S., Glasser, A. and Ryan, C. (2018). RTTD-ID: Tracked Captions with Multiple Speakers for Deaf Students. Presented at the 125th ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. 24 June, Salt Lake City, UT. ASEE Conferences. https://peer.asee.org/30945

2017

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (2016, October). Analyzing student learning using bioinformatics course modules as a platform for student engagement in research. Presented at the Young Investigators Meeting. Chicago, IL.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (July 2017) Faculty training and student learning in bioinformatics. Presented at the Transforming Research in Undergraduate STEM Education Conference. Minnesota, MN.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (July 2017). Faculty Training and Student Performance Gains in Bioinformatics. Society for the Advancement of Biology Education and Research, Minnesota, MN.

Arora, G. (2017, July). Creating a Community Science Project in Bioinformatics. Presented at the American Society of Microbiology Conference of Undergraduate Educators. Denver, CO.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (December 2016). Evidence for Student Learning in Bioinformatics. Presented at the American Society for Cell Biology. San Diego, CA.

Hem, C and Arora, G. (2016, October). Listeria monocytogenes shows evidence of horizontal gene transfer. Presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in University of Maryland. Baltimore County, MD.

Arora, G. (2017, June). NextGen Genome Solver. Workshop conducted at the Florida International University. Miami, FL.

2016

Kushalnagar, R. S. (2015). Optimal viewing distance between deaf viewers and interpreters. Journal on Technology and Persons with Disabilities, 3 (22).

Kushalnagar, R. S., Kushalnagar, P., & Haddad, F. (2016, July). SingleScreenFocus for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students. 15th International Conference on Computers Helping People with Special Needs, (pp. 433-437).Springer International Publishing, New York, NY.

Kushalnagar, R. S., Behm, G. W., Kelstone, A. W., & Ali, S. (2015, October). Tracked Speech-To-Text Display: Enhancing Accessibility and Readability of Real-Time Speech-To-Text. In Proceedings of the 17th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers & Accessibility (pp. 223-230). ACM.

2017

Waller, J. M., & Kushalnagar, R. S. (2016). Evaluation of Automatic Caption Segmentation. In Proceedings of the 18th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility - ASSETS '16 (pp. 331–332). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/2982142.2982205

Kushalnagar, P., Smith, S., Hopper, M., Ryan, C., Rinkevich, M., & Kushalnagar, R. S. (2016). Making Cancer Health Text on the Internet Easier to Read for Deaf People Who Use American Sign Language. Journal of Cancer Education, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-016-1059-5

2015

Gormally, C. (2015, July). Building teachable units and assessing learning. Workshop conducted at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, Annapolis, MD.

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